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Great May Be The Enemy Of Good
I’ve always loved love. I could argue that I may be it’s biggest fan. Yes, I’m that girl that writes love notes on a hundred 3x5 cards, leads you on a scavenger hunt, and trails rose petals on the ground. There’s nothing that makes me feel better than being loyal to someone I love regardless of the relationship. Every decision I make goes through my heart. Call me a dreamer, call me a romantic—I’m all of that.
I work hard at my job. I work hard in my sport. But there’s nothing I care to work harder at than simply giving love and being love. Failed relationships, stagnant career paths, effects of misguided intentions and ambitions sometimes cause doubts to cross my mind of whether this “heart on my sleeve” type of living is really the best way to go. But today, the message at church filled my heart with encouragement that my dedication to love is good enough.There’s no way I can say it better than it was said today in church, so I’ll just give you some good old-fashion bullet points (and questions to think on): 
Are you pursuing greatness at the neglect of relationships and your soul? 
Do you use all your energy and passion on your work and care little for your character and little for love? 
Are you on track to fulfill your dream, but you’re failing at life? 
Is your journey and the opportunities you accept and reject based on selfish ambition? 
So many people follow this pattern: Find God, Find Goodness, Reach Greatness, Forget God. The pursuit of being great can lead us to forget that our priority should instead be—being good to show God that we’re ready for His greatness, not our greatness. We need to use our greatness to reach goodness, not the other way around.
When you pursue greatness you are led by selfish ambition. How much money you make, how many people your message reaches, how many people value your product. Goodness is about caring less about your career and more about your character. It’s about caring less about dating awesome women (or men), and caring more about being an awesome date. God is more concerned about whether we are a good spouse or significant other than He is about if we are good at our jobs—no matter how impactful or positive our career is.
What will people say when you die? Will they list off all the great things you’ve done or all the great things that you are. Make people care more about who you are than what you do.
Make a million, but don’t let a million make you.
Achieve greatness, but not at the cost of goodness.
And lastly, a great quote from Thomas Carlyle, “Adversity is sometimes hard upon a man; but for one man who can stand prosperity, there are a hundred that will stand adversity.”
As I ask myself these questions today, and every day forward, I hope that my dedication to love will keep me on the path to goodness so that I can liberate His greatness to be even greater. (Thanks to Capital Church for always making me better.)

Great May Be The Enemy Of Good


I’ve always loved love. I could argue that I may be it’s biggest fan. Yes, I’m that girl that writes love notes on a hundred 3x5 cards, leads you on a scavenger hunt, and trails rose petals on the ground. There’s nothing that makes me feel better than being loyal to someone I love regardless of the relationship. Every decision I make goes through my heart. Call me a dreamer, call me a romantic—I’m all of that.


I work hard at my job. I work hard in my sport. But there’s nothing I care to work harder at than simply giving love and being love. Failed relationships, stagnant career paths, effects of misguided intentions and ambitions sometimes cause doubts to cross my mind of whether this “heart on my sleeve” type of living is really the best way to go. But today, the message at church filled my heart with encouragement that my dedication to love is good enough.

There’s no way I can say it better than it was said today in church, so I’ll just give you some good old-fashion bullet points (and questions to think on): 

  • Are you pursuing greatness at the neglect of relationships and your soul? 
  • Do you use all your energy and passion on your work and care little for your character and little for love? 
  • Are you on track to fulfill your dream, but you’re failing at life? 
  • Is your journey and the opportunities you accept and reject based on selfish ambition? 
  • So many people follow this pattern: Find God, Find Goodness, Reach Greatness, Forget God. The pursuit of being great can lead us to forget that our priority should instead be—being good to show God that we’re ready for His greatness, not our greatness. We need to use our greatness to reach goodness, not the other way around.
  • When you pursue greatness you are led by selfish ambition. How much money you make, how many people your message reaches, how many people value your product. Goodness is about caring less about your career and more about your character. It’s about caring less about dating awesome women (or men), and caring more about being an awesome date. God is more concerned about whether we are a good spouse or significant other than He is about if we are good at our jobs—no matter how impactful or positive our career is.
  • What will people say when you die? Will they list off all the great things you’ve done or all the great things that you are. Make people care more about who you are than what you do.
  • Make a million, but don’t let a million make you.
  • Achieve greatness, but not at the cost of goodness.
  • And lastly, a great quote from Thomas Carlyle, “Adversity is sometimes hard upon a man; but for one man who can stand prosperity, there are a hundred that will stand adversity.”

As I ask myself these questions today, and every day forward, I hope that my dedication to love will keep me on the path to goodness so that I can liberate His greatness to be even greater. 

(Thanks to Capital Church for always making me better.)

Posted on Sunday, September 15th 2013

Even if you don’t understand your kids, support them.
Back in 2006 I came back from playing professional soccer in Sweden and had this grandiose idea that Salt Lake City desperately needed a sneaker shop. A grandiose idea that with some amazing help from some key people, actually became a reality. On 10/10/2006 I opened the sneaker and clothing boutique, “10”.
I have stories for days. 
Without going into detail, here are my “top 10” (1-10, 10 being the best):
A star from High School Musical came in and shopped and I didn’t know who he was until he left and one of my customers told me. (Sorry, Corbin.)
Hours spent drooling over limited edition Nike Footwear catalogs and an unrequited excitement every time the UPS guy walked through the door with boxes tagged with a Nike or Adidas warehouse return address.
Knocking down walls, taking up tile, laying down wood flooring, and putting together Ikea furniture. Turning my vision into my profession.
Testing my detective skills by searching Myspace (yes it was still at it’s peak in ‘06) for the kid that broke in and stole 5K worth of inventory, finding him, telling the cops, and still not having them do anything about it. 
Surviving 2 TV interviews, a magazine cover photoshoot, and a few newspaper articles with the angst that lights and cameras cause me. 
Privately opening the shop for Kanye West’s band. 
Creating a custom sneaker studio in my shop and hiring an amazing artist that ended up hand painting sneakers for TI, Kyle Beckerman, and many others. 
The family and friends that worked, shopped, and encouraged me day in and day out—in every way.
My business partner who believed in me enough to give me an opportunity and took on the challenge with me.
Last, is #10. Although the above stories have plenty of details that I could add to them, this is one of the most vivid memories I have from my days of “10” and deserves a much deeper dive. It’s one of those memories that instantly pops up when I think about the shop. You know, the type of memory that you’re pretty sure your brain somehow saved as a photograph so you would never forget it. 
My dad always said if he retired he wanted to work at a Home Depot. I can’t explain how much he loved Home Depot. I don’t know if it was because the smell of the pine instantly took him back to his days of derby car building in Wichita, Kansas. Or maybe it was the stacks of half gauge sand paper and endless colors of spray paint that he carefully chose from when building his 11 electric guitars while he was fighting cancer. I never asked him, and now I wish I would’ve. I do, however, know if he had ever applied there, he definitely could’ve been their most overqualified applicant, and he would’ve looked dang good in one of those orange aprons. 
Back in September 2006, My dad and I had just returned to “10” from our trip to Home Depot where we had picked up 3 cans of pure white paint. 
Picture this: A man who operated on baby’s hearts every single day, doing some of the most complicated heart surgeries in the country, standing on his feet for 8 hours straight, with someone’s child’s heart in his hands—literally. His movements had to be perfect. His focus, uninterrupted and intentional. The impact of his work incomparable. I can’t imagine having the capacity to concentrate flawlessly for 8 hours straight, and my dad did it every single day. And here he is, scrubs on, 8 steps up on a ladder, rolling white paint on the ceiling of his daughter’s 900 square foot sneaker shop. He’d paint as much as he could before climbing down, move the ladder a couple feet, and climb back up —paint splattering down into his hair.
Here was one of the best Pediatric heart surgeon’s in the world putting his time (and muscles) into the store that I had put all my money, sweat, and heart into. He wasn’t there because he had this immeasurable love of sneakers or an insatiable desire to paint ceilings. And he wasn’t there because he totally understood my vision. He was there because he supported me. He was there because he wanted to be a part of me living my dreams. 
My dad didn’t always understand my passions. He didn’t always get why I pursued the things I did. But, I always had his support and he still encouraged me and helped me get where I wanted to be, regardless. He loved me unconditionally—one of the best gifts I’ll ever receive.
Is there someone in your life like my dad was in mine? If there is, go thank them. Thank your wife or husband for buying you an office chair so you can pursue your passion of building your own online business from home (without back problems). Thank your brother or sister for lending you their old school tiffany saloon lamp so you can have the perfect ambiance in your retail store. Thank your best friend for bringing you lunch on the days you had a to-do list 3 days long. Thank God for giving you the talents to pursue your passions, but more importantly for gracing your life with the people that help you live your dreams.
Dear Dad, thank you for supporting me even if you didn’t understand me.

Even if you don’t understand your kids, support them.

Back in 2006 I came back from playing professional soccer in Sweden and had this grandiose idea that Salt Lake City desperately needed a sneaker shop. A grandiose idea that with some amazing help from some key people, actually became a reality. On 10/10/2006 I opened the sneaker and clothing boutique, “10”.

I have stories for days.

Without going into detail, here are my “top 10” (1-10, 10 being the best):

  1. A star from High School Musical came in and shopped and I didn’t know who he was until he left and one of my customers told me. (Sorry, Corbin.)
  2. Hours spent drooling over limited edition Nike Footwear catalogs and an unrequited excitement every time the UPS guy walked through the door with boxes tagged with a Nike or Adidas warehouse return address.
  3. Knocking down walls, taking up tile, laying down wood flooring, and putting together Ikea furniture. Turning my vision into my profession.
  4. Testing my detective skills by searching Myspace (yes it was still at it’s peak in ‘06) for the kid that broke in and stole 5K worth of inventory, finding him, telling the cops, and still not having them do anything about it.
  5. Surviving 2 TV interviews, a magazine cover photoshoot, and a few newspaper articles with the angst that lights and cameras cause me.
  6. Privately opening the shop for Kanye West’s band.
  7. Creating a custom sneaker studio in my shop and hiring an amazing artist that ended up hand painting sneakers for TI, Kyle Beckerman, and many others.
  8. The family and friends that worked, shopped, and encouraged me day in and day out—in every way.
  9. My business partner who believed in me enough to give me an opportunity and took on the challenge with me.

Last, is #10. Although the above stories have plenty of details that I could add to them, this is one of the most vivid memories I have from my days of “10” and deserves a much deeper dive. It’s one of those memories that instantly pops up when I think about the shop. You know, the type of memory that you’re pretty sure your brain somehow saved as a photograph so you would never forget it.

My dad always said if he retired he wanted to work at a Home Depot. I can’t explain how much he loved Home Depot. I don’t know if it was because the smell of the pine instantly took him back to his days of derby car building in Wichita, Kansas. Or maybe it was the stacks of half gauge sand paper and endless colors of spray paint that he carefully chose from when building his 11 electric guitars while he was fighting cancer. I never asked him, and now I wish I would’ve. I do, however, know if he had ever applied there, he definitely could’ve been their most overqualified applicant, and he would’ve looked dang good in one of those orange aprons.

Back in September 2006, My dad and I had just returned to “10” from our trip to Home Depot where we had picked up 3 cans of pure white paint.

Picture this: A man who operated on baby’s hearts every single day, doing some of the most complicated heart surgeries in the country, standing on his feet for 8 hours straight, with someone’s child’s heart in his hands—literally. His movements had to be perfect. His focus, uninterrupted and intentional. The impact of his work incomparable. I can’t imagine having the capacity to concentrate flawlessly for 8 hours straight, and my dad did it every single day. And here he is, scrubs on, 8 steps up on a ladder, rolling white paint on the ceiling of his daughter’s 900 square foot sneaker shop. He’d paint as much as he could before climbing down, move the ladder a couple feet, and climb back up —paint splattering down into his hair.

Here was one of the best Pediatric heart surgeon’s in the world putting his time (and muscles) into the store that I had put all my money, sweat, and heart into. He wasn’t there because he had this immeasurable love of sneakers or an insatiable desire to paint ceilings. And he wasn’t there because he totally understood my vision. He was there because he supported me. He was there because he wanted to be a part of me living my dreams.

My dad didn’t always understand my passions. He didn’t always get why I pursued the things I did. But, I always had his support and he still encouraged me and helped me get where I wanted to be, regardless. He loved me unconditionally—one of the best gifts I’ll ever receive.

Is there someone in your life like my dad was in mine? If there is, go thank them. Thank your wife or husband for buying you an office chair so you can pursue your passion of building your own online business from home (without back problems). Thank your brother or sister for lending you their old school tiffany saloon lamp so you can have the perfect ambiance in your retail store. Thank your best friend for bringing you lunch on the days you had a to-do list 3 days long. Thank God for giving you the talents to pursue your passions, but more importantly for gracing your life with the people that help you live your dreams.

Dear Dad, thank you for supporting me even if you didn’t understand me.

Posted on Wednesday, April 24th 2013

It’s all in the details. Good to see legendary street artists like Andre collaborate with great brands. 
Read more: Complex Magazine

It’s all in the details. Good to see legendary street artists like Andre collaborate with great brands. 

Read more: Complex Magazine

Posted on Saturday, February 23rd 2013

What Zidane Taught Me About Teaching the Beautiful Game
I’ve been playing the beautiful game for over 25 years. About 10 years ago I really started getting into watching international games. In fact, I have a library of VHS tapes (yeah, you heard it right) that I still watch almost every night. France vs. Brazil in the 2006 World Cup is a classic, in my opinion.
Zidane was artistic in his simplicity. Dominating in his elegant play. Mesmerizing in his vision and execution. He was the man. 
I studied him. I copied him. I tried to imitate him. I rewinded and replayed his movements on the tv, in my head and then in my movements as I spent hours trying to replicate his moves and technique. 
There was some benefit to my game from my Zidane studies. But what was even more beneficial was… studying Zidane helped me learn not only how to teach myself, but how I could break it down and teach someone else. It’s one thing to be good at the beautiful game, but it’s another level to be good and pass on that goodness to the youth.
Make sure to check out the amazing Zidane print (and other soccer prints) by Stanley Chow. 

What Zidane Taught Me About Teaching the Beautiful Game

I’ve been playing the beautiful game for over 25 years. About 10 years ago I really started getting into watching international games. In fact, I have a library of VHS tapes (yeah, you heard it right) that I still watch almost every night. France vs. Brazil in the 2006 World Cup is a classic, in my opinion.

Zidane was artistic in his simplicity. Dominating in his elegant play. Mesmerizing in his vision and execution. He was the man. 

I studied him. I copied him. I tried to imitate him. I rewinded and replayed his movements on the tv, in my head and then in my movements as I spent hours trying to replicate his moves and technique. 

There was some benefit to my game from my Zidane studies. But what was even more beneficial was… studying Zidane helped me learn not only how to teach myself, but how I could break it down and teach someone else. It’s one thing to be good at the beautiful game, but it’s another level to be good and pass on that goodness to the youth.

Make sure to check out the amazing Zidane print (and other soccer prints) by Stanley Chow

Posted on Friday, October 12th 2012

Tags soccer art stanley chow prints design athlete football zidance france the 10 influence what makes me stronger inspireme

I love when sports and fashion collide. Coach wallets made from vintage baseball gloves. 
“Over the summer Coach launched its “Baseball Heritage Collection”, which included limited edition wallets crafted from 70-year-old baseball gloves. Coach acquired the vintage leather on eBay and disassembled hundreds of mitts to construct the accessory collection. Currently out of stock online, hit the thumbs for a closer look at these incredible wallets by Coach.”
Found on Complex

I love when sports and fashion collide. Coach wallets made from vintage baseball gloves. 

Over the summer Coach launched its “Baseball Heritage Collection”, which included limited edition wallets crafted from 70-year-old baseball gloves. Coach acquired the vintage leather on eBay and disassembled hundreds of mitts to construct the accessory collection. Currently out of stock online, hit the thumbs for a closer look at these incredible wallets by Coach.”

Found on Complex

Posted on Sunday, September 16th 2012

Tags complex goods the 10 influence coach wallets designer recycled leather baseball baseball gloves vintage

the10influence:

I designed this in honor of today’s holiday. This is definitely one of the most important parts of the Declaration of Independence.
“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Happy 4th of July!

the10influence:

I designed this in honor of today’s holiday. This is definitely one of the most important parts of the Declaration of Independence.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Happy 4th of July!

Posted on Wednesday, July 4th 2012

Reblogged from The 10 Influence 

Sometimes Inspiration Doesn’t Fall Far From The Family Tree. Meet My Great Uncle, Jim.
We all go through times in our lives where we’re unsure of the direction we’re going. We may ask ourselves—am I doing enough? Is my current job just adding to my wallet, or is it adding to the greater good? Are the people around me making me better or just making me look better?
Everyone needs inspiration. It doesn’t have to come from reading the International Bestseller “The Alchemist” by Paulo Coelho and traveling to the pyramids to discover your Personal Legend (although I’m tempted and am only on page 90). Sometimes the people closest to you have lived the most inspirational lives. Their legacy is part of your story. Inspiration can’t get much bigger than that. 
Now’s a good time to introduce my great uncle, James Smoot Coleman, or Jim. I’ve never met him. I never got a chance to hear how many countries he worked in or how he raised his 2 sons. I do know, however, that he has walked in the same side door that I walk in every day. He’s sat in the chair that I’m typing this in, although probably not for long. According to my grandmother Jane, he was always on the go. Fun and ambitious. An unmatched sense of humor. I also know that he was the first director of the UCLA African Studies Center. In 1978 he was the associate director of the Rockefeller Foundation. (No, not Jay-Z’s Roc-A-Fella. Hov, you’re still Brooklyn’s Finest though.) 
He was among the first American scholars to not only acknowledge and understand the African perspective, but he tirelessly worked to emphasize its importance. Detail oriented. Limitless vision. Full of graceful charm. All things I strive to have. And be. Inspiration—no doubt.

Sometimes Inspiration Doesn’t Fall Far From The Family Tree. Meet My Great Uncle, Jim.

We all go through times in our lives where we’re unsure of the direction we’re going. We may ask ourselves—am I doing enough? Is my current job just adding to my wallet, or is it adding to the greater good? Are the people around me making me better or just making me look better?

Everyone needs inspiration. It doesn’t have to come from reading the International Bestseller “The Alchemist” by Paulo Coelho and traveling to the pyramids to discover your Personal Legend (although I’m tempted and am only on page 90). Sometimes the people closest to you have lived the most inspirational lives. Their legacy is part of your story. Inspiration can’t get much bigger than that.

Now’s a good time to introduce my great uncle, James Smoot Coleman, or Jim. I’ve never met him. I never got a chance to hear how many countries he worked in or how he raised his 2 sons. I do know, however, that he has walked in the same side door that I walk in every day. He’s sat in the chair that I’m typing this in, although probably not for long. According to my grandmother Jane, he was always on the go. Fun and ambitious. An unmatched sense of humor. I also know that he was the first director of the UCLA African Studies Center. In 1978 he was the associate director of the Rockefeller Foundation. (No, not Jay-Z’s Roc-A-Fella. Hov, you’re still Brooklyn’s Finest though.)

He was among the first American scholars to not only acknowledge and understand the African perspective, but he tirelessly worked to emphasize its importance. Detail oriented. Limitless vision. Full of graceful charm. All things I strive to have. And be. Inspiration—no doubt.

Posted on Sunday, July 1st 2012

Tags africa african studies alchemist coleman inspire inspireme jay-z love rockefeller travel ucla the 10 influence

Simple, brilliant outdoor library installation.
"Massimo Bartolini’s outdoor library installation titled Bookyard is one of the most simple, brilliant installations to ever exist. Located in the middle of a vineyard in Ghent, Belgium for the festival, TRACK: A Contemporary City Conversation, visitors can take any of the books for a donation.”
via Complex

Simple, brilliant outdoor library installation.

"Massimo Bartolini’s outdoor library installation titled Bookyard is one of the most simple, brilliant installations to ever exist. Located in the middle of a vineyard in Ghent, Belgium for the festival, TRACK: A Contemporary City Conversation, visitors can take any of the books for a donation.”

via Complex

Posted on Monday, June 25th 2012

Tags art becreative books city contemporary creative ghent installation library outdoor read vineyard the 10 influence

This may just make me a fan of Foursquare again. 
I’ve debated whether 10% off a coffee or $5 off some soccer cleats is worth broadcasting where I may be, and when. Although the competitive aspect of Foursquare has kept me mildly engaged, I have yet to be inspired to be fully engaged… until now. 
(Red) and Starbucks have teamed up to create Foursquare’s largest Non-Profit campaign yet. They sure do know my weakness. Coffee and a chance to be a part of something that aims to make the world a better place? That’s definitely a combination right up my alley. 
So, that being said, I apologize in advance for my ceaseless Starbucks check-in’s between June 1 and June 10th. For every check-in $1 goes to fight AIDS. 
Check out all the details of the campaign here: (RED)RUSH
(Thanks for the tip, Techcrunch)

This may just make me a fan of Foursquare again. 

I’ve debated whether 10% off a coffee or $5 off some soccer cleats is worth broadcasting where I may be, and when. Although the competitive aspect of Foursquare has kept me mildly engaged, I have yet to be inspired to be fully engaged… until now. 

(Red) and Starbucks have teamed up to create Foursquare’s largest Non-Profit campaign yet. They sure do know my weakness. Coffee and a chance to be a part of something that aims to make the world a better place? That’s definitely a combination right up my alley. 

So, that being said, I apologize in advance for my ceaseless Starbucks check-in’s between June 1 and June 10th. For every check-in $1 goes to fight AIDS. 

Check out all the details of the campaign here: (RED)RUSH

(Thanks for the tip, Techcrunch)

Posted on Thursday, May 31st 2012

Tags (RED) Foursquare HIV RED aids charity check in coffee non profit social social media starbucks techcrunch inspireme